Hard Conversations for Adult Children With Aging Parents

Adult Daughter Talking To Depressed Father At Home

Parents are the touch stones of our lives. Warm memories of learning to ride a bike, toss a baseball, or swim for the first time, not only bring us back to a moment in time growing up. They also take a vivid picture of parents at a much younger age, when they were likely more active and energetic. While many now-much older parents may still remain active, healthy, and social well into their later years, there are those seniors who may be losing a bit off of their “fast ball” and slowing down a bit in a number of ways. It’s a challenge that both aging parents and their adult children face.   Continue reading

Talk to Your Kids About: Alcohol

It’s “every parent’s nightmare”Mother and Daughter Talking to lose a child. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), says that 29 people die in cars each day as a result of drinking and driving. Underage drinkers age 12 to 20 drink 11 percent of all alcohol in the U.S., with more than 90 percent of it consumed by binge drinking (drinking to excess). But whether someone underage starts drinking because of peer pressure or depression; whether they get behind the wheel while impaired and hurt themselves (or someone else); or die due to alcohol poisoning, another accident, or suicide, talking to kids about alcohol’s dangers can help avoid tragedy.

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Young Adults’ Rising Risk of Colorectal Cancer

Friends group drinking cappuccino at coffee bar restaurant - People talking and having fun together at fashion cafeteria - Friendship concept with happy men and women at cafe - Warm vintage filter (Friends group drinking cappuccino at coffee bar restaYou may already know that the American Cancer Society (ACS) changed its former colonoscopy screening guidelines from age 50 to age 45 for those of average risk and no family history. But you may not know why.

The disease has seen a marked increase among young adults in the U.S. under age 55 at a rate of two percent each year since the mid-1990s. A study by the American Cancer Society, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, found that millennials* born in 1990 have double the risk of colon cancer and quadruple the risk of rectal cancer, compared to people born near 1950.

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