Get Hip to Hepatitis, Then Prevent It

Variety may be the spice of life, but not when it comes to hepatitis (inflammation of the liver). Whether acute (short-term), or chronic (long-term), each one from this “family” of viruses can have an extremely serious impact on the body. Yet, hepatitis can be prevented, either by avoiding exposure, or (with the exception of hepatitis C, and the rarer D and E strains), by getting vaccinated.

Continue reading

Where There’s Smokeless, There’s Still Fire: Smokeless Tobacco Dangers

The list of diseases resulting from smoking is long and devastating, from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and emphysema, to lung cancer, and more. Cigarette smoking alone accounts for more than 480,000 deaths per year (about one in five deaths annually), and more than 16 million people live with a smoking-related disease.

Continue reading

The Grown-Up Lunchbox

A U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report cited that Americans spend over $3,000 each year on eating out, in general. (Spending an average of $10 per out-of-office lunch per work week alone can set you back $2,500 per year!) According to a 2016 study from the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 92 percent of restaurant meals have too many calories.

Continue reading

Keep Moving for a Healthy Heart

Face it: You just feel better when you eat right, and exercise more. From lean chicken and fish, to healthy fruits, and veggies; from low-fat or skim dairy (or vitamin-fortified soy milk, or yogurt), to whole grains – plus water for optimal hydration – good food is like fuel for your body. What you eat and how much you move matters when it comes to weight or developing a chronic condition like cancer, diabetes, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Making wise choices now can have a huge impact on both longevity and quality of life as you age.

Continue reading

The New Blood Pressure Numbers: Keep Yours Under Control

If your blood pressure numbers are on the rise, it’s important to know that your risk for high blood pressure (hypertension) increases with age. (For men, it’s around age 45; for women, it’s around age 65+.) Maybe there’s been some family, financial, or work stress. If you use tobacco in any form (smoking or smokeless), quit now. Maybe you’ve been grabbing fast food on the run, or not getting enough exercise or sleep. You may even have a family history of high blood pressure. (If you’re African-American, it’s more common.) Stress and unwise lifestyle choices add up – and may lead to a heart attack or stroke.

Continue reading