Young Adults’ Rising Risk of Colorectal Cancer

Friends group drinking cappuccino at coffee bar restaurant - People talking and having fun together at fashion cafeteria - Friendship concept with happy men and women at cafe - Warm vintage filter (Friends group drinking cappuccino at coffee bar restaYou may already know that the American Cancer Society (ACS) changed its former colonoscopy screening guidelines from age 50 to age 45 for those of average risk and no family history. But you may not know why.

The disease has seen a marked increase among young adults in the U.S. under age 55 at a rate of two percent each year since the mid-1990s. A study by the American Cancer Society, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, found that millennials* born in 1990 have double the risk of colon cancer and quadruple the risk of rectal cancer, compared to people born near 1950.

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Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD): Are You at Risk?

High Cropped shot of an unrecognizable man suffering with foot cramp in the roomcholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, and weight gain can all play significant roles when it comes to heart disease and stroke. PAD — also called Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD) — is another concerning condition to be aware of and avoid, because it’s often overlooked and undiagnosed.

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Love Your Heart

Senior African American Couple Walking Through Fall WoodlandThere’s no sugar-coating it (even around Valentine’s Day).

According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the number one cause of death in the world, and the leading cause of death in the U.S., killing over 366,800 Americans a year (about one every 43 seconds). It’s the number one killer of women in the U.S., taking more lives than all forms of cancer combined. Heart issues in women can be more subtle. That’s dangerous, because women often misread the trouble signs while having an actual heart attack for things like acid reflux or flu. In fact, 64 percent of women who die from coronary heart disease (a narrowing of the arteries or blood vessels that supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart) had no previous symptoms. And heart disease is also the number one killer of men. (It doesn’t discriminate.)

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Creamy Ginger-Lemon Salad Dressing

Homemade asian peanut dressing with black sesame seedsThis light, Asian-influenced dressing gets its creaminess from Greek yogurt, and its tang from the blend of lemon and ginger. It’s an easy, quick, and tasty paring with any mixed greens combo, with just 33 calories, 1 g of carbohydrate, zero cholesterol, 2.5 g of total fat, 2 g of protein, and 2 g of sugar. (And why couldn’t you drizzle it on chicken or seafood as well?!)

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Say ‘Hi’ to Your BMI (Body Mass Index)

woman on a medical weight scale

Obesity brings with it a roster of related health conditions, from cancer, coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke, to gallbladder disease, mental illness, osteoarthritis, and type 2 diabetes — to name just a few. So it makes sense to try and maintain a healthy weight by eating right and exercising often. For adults, that means working up to working out five days a week for 30 minutes each; kids need 60 minutes of exercise daily.

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Detoxify Naturally by Eating Well!

Cape Town, South Africa

The beginning of a new year is when most of us start thinking about fresh starts, and push the re-set button on food and fitness. The idea of ridding the body of poisons via a “cleanse” that promises to burn fat or lose weight may be tempting. But think twice: Starving yourself by excluding solid food for a week and chugging some low-cal/low-protein miracle drink doesn’t work for healthy weight

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Winter Blues? It Could Be SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder)

woman looking through the window on a winter day.

Winter means shorter daylight hours, along with colder temperatures. While extremes depend upon what area of the country you live in, that change can be a bear for those craving longer, sunlit days to extend activities into the evening. Those “winter blues” can start to creep in early, with feelings of wanting to hibernate until spring. They can also make you feel cranky, moody, unfocused, and craving carbs.

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The Flu Is Nothing to Sneeze At

Seasonal cold. Adult man sitting on the sofa and holding a paper tissue while sneezing.

Did you know that a cough or a sneeze can spread the flu up to six feet away? Besides catching the flu months before the winter really hits, you can also catch it even later into the spring (a time not normally associated with flu season). Flu season is at its worst in January and February, and since the vaccine takes a couple of weeks to begin working in the body, the sooner you get vaccinated, the better.

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Eye Exams: Finding Diabetes Warning Signs

Young woman is being examined of her eyesight by optometrist

Did you know that eye exams often provide the earliest chance of detecting diabetes at its onset? (Blurry vision can be a warning sign for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, although some with type 2 may not have this symptom. This is temporary, and vision will return to normal once blood sugars are under control.)

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Take Charge of Type 2 Diabetes

Mature man looking in cooking pot while wife stirsAbout 90 to 95 percent of the 30 million Americans who live with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. About 15 to 30 percent of people with increased risk for diabetes (commonly referred to as prediabetes) will develop type 2 diabetes within just five years. Here’s what’s scary: Many of the 84 million who have prediabetes don’t know it. With prediabetes, an A1C test will show blood sugar levels are high, just not as high as type 2.

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