Smoke Alarms and Escape Plans Go Hand in Hand

Sound the alarm (the smoke alarm that is). Smoke alarms are your path to safety in the event of a house fire, because if one sounds, that’s your cue to move you and your family calmly and quickly outside, and call 9-1-1. Smoke spreads fast, and can not only incapacitate you, causing serious injury (smoke inhalation can be deadly), it can impact visibility to escape.

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Be Wheel Smart: Drive Without Distractions

We are indeed a nation of multitaskers, and we give ourselves pats on the backs for accomplishing so much daily. But while we may pride ourselves on this juggling act, at the office or at home, a key place where it doesn’t work is in the car. There, reaching for that cell phone or balancing a drive-through burger can cost you (or someone else) a life.

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Where There’s Smokeless, There’s Still Fire: Smokeless Tobacco Dangers

The list of diseases resulting from smoking is long and devastating, from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and emphysema, to lung cancer, and more. Cigarette smoking alone accounts for more than 480,000 deaths per year (about one in five deaths annually), and more than 16 million people live with a smoking-related disease.

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Tackle Your Yard with Safety in Mind

With the days of late summer fading out, you’re starting to police the yard and deciding what to tackle once cooler temperatures prevail. Before the first leaf falls (if you live someplace where the seasons noticeably change), you can start ridding the deck of spent potted flowers, prepping a fresh patch of ground for bulb planting, clearing yard debris, cutting back shrubs, touching up the porch paint — you get the picture.

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When in Doubt, Throw It Out

No matter how much you might be craving that leftover potato salad, if it’s past its prime, don’t dine.

Each year, one in six people in the U.S. gets food poisoning from the Salmonella, Listeria, and E. coli bacteria in spoiled food. That’s 48 million cases annually with 128,000 hospitalizations (and 3,000 deaths).

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