Tackle Your Yard with Safety in Mind

With the days of late summer fading out, you’re starting to police the yard and deciding what to tackle once cooler temperatures prevail. Before the first leaf falls (if you live someplace where the seasons noticeably change), you can start ridding the deck of spent potted flowers, prepping a fresh patch of ground for bulb planting, clearing yard debris, cutting back shrubs, touching up the porch paint — you get the picture.

Continue reading

When in Doubt, Throw It Out

No matter how much you might be craving that leftover potato salad, if it’s past its prime, don’t dine.

Each year, one in six people in the U.S. gets food poisoning from the Salmonella, Listeria, and E. coli bacteria in spoiled food. That’s 48 million cases annually with 128,000 hospitalizations (and 3,000 deaths).

Continue reading

Say “Buzz Off” to Mosquitos That Carry Disease

Mosquitos and summer go hand in hand, as the days are longer and activities can stretch from the early morning into dusk. The longer time spent outdoors, the more exposure we have to annoying dive-bomber mosquitos and other bugs that bite. But some mosquitos can pose a real danger to humans and pets, especially when they carry either the West Nile virus or the Zika virus — diseases like that can’t be prevented with a vaccine or medication. That’s why protection is key, if we want to enjoy the season as planned.

Continue reading

Ticks: Unwelcome Passengers

Ticks – the small, blood-sucking bugs that live outdoors in grass, leaf piles, trees, and shrubs – like to hitch a ride: on you, or your dog, or your cat. Unlike other bugs, ticks like to stick around by remaining attached to your body after they bite. Most tick bites are harmless, but some pass diseases on to their human or animal “landing” sites, often causing symptoms within the first few weeks.

Continue reading