Smothered Greens

We’re getting our “southern” on with this dish that combines your pick of good-for-you leafy greens together, or, pick your favorite, from collard to kale, mustard to turnip! At just 80 calories per serving ‒ only 16 mg cholesterol, 2 g fat, and 378 mg sodium ‒ this is a mouth-watering take on a classic (and a great source of potassium too, at 472 mg). Add this satisfying “side” to chicken or fish!

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Grilled Spice-Rubbed Salmon

Salmon is a superb choice for one of your two recommended servings of fish each week, especially because it’s a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, known to help lower cholesterol (reducing the chance of heart disease). Here’s a 190-calorie recipe that’s high in protein (23 g), and low in fat (9 g), with (bonus!) a zesty rub that you can also use for other types of fish or chicken.

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The Grown-Up Lunchbox

A U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report cited that Americans spend over $3,000 each year on eating out, in general. (Spending an average of $10 per out-of-office lunch per work week alone can set you back $2,500 per year!) According to a 2016 study from the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 92 percent of restaurant meals have too many calories.

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Green Juice Smoothie

This smoothie provides a quick, refreshing start to the day, and is a light energy-booster prior to a workout. At just 80 calories, with 2 grams of protein, it’s low in fat (just 0.5 grams!) and sugar, too (15 grams). It’s also got no cholesterol and delivers a good source of potassium (370 m.). Drink it up and start your engine!

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It’s Still a Party With Diabetes

A house party, during the holidays or anytime, always begs the question, “What can I bring?”

If you have diabetes, there is a conscious effort to choose something that you can not only eat, but that will be just as delicious as all of the other goodies on the table. You want to be able to enjoy the spread as much as the next person (albeit with some restrictions), but also adhere to your own health guidelines without drawing attention, or making anyone else feel uncomfortable.

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