A Less Frightful Halloween with Allergies or Diabetes

trick-or-treating. Teal pumpkin. the concept of health for children in the Halloween seasonA child having a dangerous physical reaction to something they’ve eaten, drank, or touched can be a parent’s worst nightmare. It’s even scarier when they know that their kid has allergies to foods, or an issue with sugar, as a result of diabetes. That’s a fear at any time of the year, but it can creep in like a monster when Halloween rolls around.    Continue reading

Safer, Spicier Picnics

Family Camping By Lake On Hiking Adventure In ForestPicnic season is underway, a time for outdoor food and fun. But it’s also an opportunity to look at not only what we’re eating and how to prepare it safely, but with a little more flavor! (And that doesn’t mean more salt.)

Safety First

Each year, one in six people in the U.S. gets food poisoning from the E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella in spoiled food. That’s 48 million cases annually with 128,000 hospitalizations (and 3,000 deaths). Avoid sickness with these tips:

Continue reading

Solving the Allergy Puzzle

Skin prick allergy to find out kind of allergy

Sniffles and sneezing due to allergies can feel just about as bad as a head cold. Skin rashes are so itchy, they can have you losing sleep. More often than not, the “triggers” to feeling miserable can include everything from dust and mold inside, to flower and tree pollen outdoors; from materials like latex (rubber), to medicines (like some antibiotics), not to mention laundry detergents or shampoos. Food allergies can also kick reactions into dangerous, sometimes life-threatening levels for some people. In any case, when symptoms are extreme, allergy testing for things that you may breathe, eat, or touch may help determine exactly what allergens are causing problems, and what to avoid.

Continue reading

Is Your Child’s Juice Box or Snack Safe? (Make Sure There’s NO Nicotine)

Young boy sips from a juice box on a sunny summer afternoon. More

Nicotine is in tobacco products, like cigarettes, but it’s also in e-liquid, the main substance that’s inserted into e-cigarettes for vaping. It’s what gets breathed in as the e-liquid turns into a mist or vapor. Vaping has (unfortunately) become a growing trend, not only among adults, but kids, too. While studies are ongoing, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) has sounded the alarm, saying there’s already enough evidence to prevent vaping device use by youths and young adults.

 

Continue reading