Sunny-Side Up: Maintaining Your Optimism

Staying Optimistic

Hey, life happens. If only we could all acknowledge when day-to-day challenges sometimes push us a little too far. We’ve all been there; the day starts out with promise, we rise, we shine, and are raring to go. Then, we get stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic, our drive-through coffee order is all wrong, and a can’t-miss meeting gets moved up, right in the middle of some long- anticipated time off. It’s a ripple effect of a day gone wrong.

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Fear of public speaking: How can I overcome it?

Biz_group-1-hiCMYKFear of public speaking is a common phobia. It can range from slight nervousness to paralyzing fear and panic. Many people with a fear of public speaking avoid public speaking situations altogether, or they suffer through them with shaking hands and a quavering voice. But with preparation and persistence, you can overcome your fear. Continue reading

Intervention: Help a loved one overcome addiction

grieving-iStock_000022888560Small-300x220It can be challenging to help a loved one struggling with alcoholism, drug problems, an eating disorder or other destructive behavior. Sometimes a direct, heart-to-heart conversation can start the road to recovery. But when it comes to addiction, a more focused approach is often needed. You may need to join forces with others and take action through a formal intervention.  Continue reading

Alcohol use

wine_AfAm coupleWhen it comes to alcohol, it can be hard to know how much is “too much.” While a small amount of red wine per day may provide some health benefits, it can also interfere with medication. Some medical conditions can get worse with alcohol. If you drink, it’s best to ask your doctor how much is safe for you. The following article provides some general guidelines about alcohol use.
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Everyday mindfulness

SAF 0672How mindfulness can help you live a healthier, happier life
Although we may be driving or waiting in line, many of us are thinking about other things – work deadlines, a recent spat or an unpaid bill. As Zen monk Thich Nhat Hanh says, we may be caught in the past or the future instead of living deeply in the present moment.1 This is called “monkey mind” – when our thoughts leap from place to place. Continue reading