A Less Frightful Halloween with Allergies or Diabetes

trick-or-treating. Teal pumpkin. the concept of health for children in the Halloween seasonA child having a dangerous physical reaction to something they’ve eaten, drank, or touched can be a parent’s worst nightmare. It’s even scarier when they know that their kid has allergies to foods, or an issue with sugar, as a result of diabetes. That’s a fear at any time of the year, but it can creep in like a monster when Halloween rolls around.    Continue reading

Be a Breast Cancer Warrior

Woman walking and talkingThe American Cancer Society’s (ACS) most recent statistics cite that breast cancer in women dropped 40 percent from 1989 to 2016. That drop is thanks, in part, to groundbreaking research. But just as importantly, it’s due to prevention and early detection (including self-exam and mammography). In recent years, though, breast cancer rates have increased slightly by four percent, and it’s still the second leading cause of cancer death in women (second to lung cancer). Continue reading

Make the Most of Recess!

Group of kids elastic ropes together on the streetHealth experts say that kids ages six to 17 years old should get at least 60 minutes of exercise each day, but even recess times can vary from state to state during the school year. (Many parents and teachers have spoken out when recess time has been slashed, asking for more break time to benefit young students.) Parents with kids who home school have an even bigger challenge if they’re slipping into less-structured playtime. And even in summer, despite all of the chances to be outdoors, computer games may still beckon inside or on the sidelines. Continue reading

You’re in the Driver’s Seat: Don’t Leave Kids or Pets in Hot Cars

portrait of mother and little daughter driving in car togetherIf you’re rushing around as the family’s “taxi driver” between activities, appointments, and errands, you might just be taking precious cargo for granted. Don’t: In 2018 (the deadliest year on record in the past 20 years, according to the National Safety Council [NSC]), 52 children in the U.S. died when left in a locked, hot car. Pediatric vehicular heatstroke or PVH (also known as hyperthermia) was the cause of almost 800 kids dying since 1998. Continue reading

Ticks: Unwelcome Guests Who Pack More Than One Disease

Concept of healthy lifestyle with dog and man hiking outdoorRoughly 300,000 people may get Lyme disease annually in the U.S., but only about 30,000 even get reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) each year. The bug responsible? The black-legged (formerly deer) tick. These small, blood-sucking bugs that live outdoors in grass, leaf piles, trees, and shrubs like to hitch a ride on you, your dog, or your cat. Unlike other bugs, ticks like to stick around by remaining attached to your body after they bite. Most tick bites are harmless. But there are almost 60 different tick species known to bite and transmit illnesses to people. Diseases (like Lyme) or bacterial infections (like Rocky Mountain spotted fever and others) often cause symptoms within the first few days or weeks. Continue reading

Don’t Let Mosquitoes Crash Your Party

Mosquito sucking bloodAlong with the joys of summer, comes rising temperatures and humidity. It’s the perfect playground for mosquitoes, who are all too happy to crash-land into your outing or picnic. Now is a good time to review the dangers of the diseases these insects carry, provide some updates, and know how to protect yourself and your family, especially with a long mosquito season, from summer right into fall. Continue reading

Safety First at Amusement and Water Parks

Family in bumper carsAccording to the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions (IAAPA), about 370 million people ride 1.7 billion rides at 400 North American fixed-site (non-travelling) amusement parks annually. Accidents do happen.

The U.S. Product Safety Commission estimated that U.S. emergency rooms saw 30,900 amusement park injuries in 2016 alone (the most recent data available).

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Solving the Allergy Puzzle

Skin prick allergy to find out kind of allergy

Sniffles and sneezing due to allergies can feel just about as bad as a head cold. Skin rashes are so itchy, they can have you losing sleep. More often than not, the “triggers” to feeling miserable can include everything from dust and mold inside, to flower and tree pollen outdoors; from materials like latex (rubber), to medicines (like some antibiotics), not to mention laundry detergents or shampoos. Food allergies can also kick reactions into dangerous, sometimes life-threatening levels for some people. In any case, when symptoms are extreme, allergy testing for things that you may breathe, eat, or touch may help determine exactly what allergens are causing problems, and what to avoid.

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