You’re in the Driver’s Seat: Don’t Leave Kids or Pets in Hot Cars

portrait of mother and little daughter driving in car togetherIf you’re rushing around as the family’s “taxi driver” between activities, appointments, and errands, you might just be taking precious cargo for granted. Don’t: In 2018 (the deadliest year on record in the past 20 years, according to the National Safety Council [NSC]), 52 children in the U.S. died when left in a locked, hot car. Pediatric vehicular heatstroke or PVH (also known as hyperthermia) was the cause of almost 800 kids dying since 1998. Continue reading

Ticks: Unwelcome Guests Who Pack More Than One Disease

Concept of healthy lifestyle with dog and man hiking outdoorRoughly 300,000 people may get Lyme disease annually in the U.S., but only about 30,000 even get reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) each year. The bug responsible? The black-legged (formerly deer) tick. These small, blood-sucking bugs that live outdoors in grass, leaf piles, trees, and shrubs like to hitch a ride on you, your dog, or your cat. Unlike other bugs, ticks like to stick around by remaining attached to your body after they bite. Most tick bites are harmless. But there are almost 60 different tick species known to bite and transmit illnesses to people. Diseases (like Lyme) or bacterial infections (like Rocky Mountain spotted fever and others) often cause symptoms within the first few days or weeks. Continue reading

Don’t Let Mosquitoes Crash Your Party

Mosquito sucking bloodAlong with the joys of summer, comes rising temperatures and humidity. It’s the perfect playground for mosquitoes, who are all too happy to crash-land into your outing or picnic. Now is a good time to review the dangers of the diseases these insects carry, provide some updates, and know how to protect yourself and your family, especially with a long mosquito season, from summer right into fall. Continue reading

Safety First at Amusement and Water Parks

Family in bumper carsAccording to the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions (IAAPA), about 370 million people ride 1.7 billion rides at 400 North American fixed-site (non-travelling) amusement parks annually. Accidents do happen.

The U.S. Product Safety Commission estimated that U.S. emergency rooms saw 30,900 amusement park injuries in 2016 alone (the most recent data available).

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Solving the Allergy Puzzle

Skin prick allergy to find out kind of allergy

Sniffles and sneezing due to allergies can feel just about as bad as a head cold. Skin rashes are so itchy, they can have you losing sleep. More often than not, the “triggers” to feeling miserable can include everything from dust and mold inside, to flower and tree pollen outdoors; from materials like latex (rubber), to medicines (like some antibiotics), not to mention laundry detergents or shampoos. Food allergies can also kick reactions into dangerous, sometimes life-threatening levels for some people. In any case, when symptoms are extreme, allergy testing for things that you may breathe, eat, or touch may help determine exactly what allergens are causing problems, and what to avoid.

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Talk to Your Kids About: Alcohol

It’s “every parent’s nightmare”Mother and Daughter Talking to lose a child. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), says that 29 people die in cars each day as a result of drinking and driving. Underage drinkers age 12 to 20 drink 11 percent of all alcohol in the U.S., with more than 90 percent of it consumed by binge drinking (drinking to excess). But whether someone underage starts drinking because of peer pressure or depression; whether they get behind the wheel while impaired and hurt themselves (or someone else); or die due to alcohol poisoning, another accident, or suicide, talking to kids about alcohol’s dangers can help avoid tragedy.

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The “Yuck” Factor: Getting Kids to Try (and Like) Healthy, New Foods

Focused loving father is using the blender to make smoothie while his son is holding ears while smiling in a bright kitchen. (Focused loving father is using the blender to make smoothie while his son is holding ears while smiling in a bright kitchen.,If you’re a parent, you may find yourself in a tug of war with your kids about food. That includes what you’d like them to try, and what they’ll actually eat. This battle of wills can be frustrating, especially when you’ve exhausted all methods of persuasion.

Bribing picky eaters with dessert isn’t the way to go, either. Treats are okay once in a while, but the idea is to get them used to eating healthier food overall. Having them try healthier choices (many made in a way that they’ve never had before, and might like) is the goal.

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Young Adults’ Rising Risk of Colorectal Cancer

Friends group drinking cappuccino at coffee bar restaurant - People talking and having fun together at fashion cafeteria - Friendship concept with happy men and women at cafe - Warm vintage filter (Friends group drinking cappuccino at coffee bar restaYou may already know that the American Cancer Society (ACS) changed its former colonoscopy screening guidelines from age 50 to age 45 for those of average risk and no family history. But you may not know why.

The disease has seen a marked increase among young adults in the U.S. under age 55 at a rate of two percent each year since the mid-1990s. A study by the American Cancer Society, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, found that millennials* born in 1990 have double the risk of colon cancer and quadruple the risk of rectal cancer, compared to people born near 1950.

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