Eye Exams: Finding Diabetes Warning Signs

Young woman is being examined of her eyesight by optometrist

Did you know that eye exams often provide the earliest chance of detecting diabetes at its onset? (Blurry vision can be a warning sign for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, although some with type 2 may not have this symptom. This is temporary, and vision will return to normal once blood sugars are under control.)

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Take Charge of Type 2 Diabetes

Mature man looking in cooking pot while wife stirsAbout 90 to 95 percent of the 30 million Americans who live with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. About 15 to 30 percent of people with increased risk for diabetes (commonly referred to as prediabetes) will develop type 2 diabetes within just five years. Here’s what’s scary: Many of the 84 million who have prediabetes don’t know it. With prediabetes, an A1C test will show blood sugar levels are high, just not as high as type 2.

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Apricot Pine Nut Couscous

couscous mixed with chopped dried apricots and fresh parsley

Get your grain on, with this perfect side for roasted chicken, turkey, or baked fish, and pair it with a favorite vegetable. The pine nuts provide the crunch (but you could also substitute chopped almonds).* The quick 10-minute prep time gives you more time away from the stove (and you won’t sweat the calories).

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Smoking and COPD: Commit to Quit

man enjoying a walk and fresh air in nature.

We’re all acutely aware of the dangers of smoking, but if you’re dealing with other health conditions, it can also greatly impact your ability to effectively manage those conditions. If you have diabetes, smoking can worsen chronic conditions, like diabetes-related eye problems, blood vessel issues, foot problems, nerve damage, and more. Smoking is also a road that can lead to heart disease, in addition to bladder, kidney, lung, or pancreatic cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

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Pumpkin Apple Protein Bars

Organic homemade granola bars on rustic wooden background - Healthy vegetarian snack

Here’s a delightfully chewy protein bar for the morning commute, to fuel-up for the gym, or to re-fuel after that workout (but it’s really a healthy, go-to snack or tea-time treat any time of day). And take note for the holidays: This one’s a simply-sweet gift that you can make for friends, too, so get your cellophane bags and ribbons ready! (These stack nicely cut into 2-inch square portions.)

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Keeping Diet and Exercise on Track

Caucasian family playing basketball together. Happy family spending free time together.

What causes a “break” in good food habits? Why get tempted by candy or chips, when you could reach for grapes, or whole-grain crackers? Why is it that you can work out for a few weeks, then end up in front of the TV for days later? These questions can haunt even the most dedicated of those trying to follow a healthy lifestyle. (No one’s perfect!)

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Say ‘Boo!’ to Tooth Decay This Halloween

Three Children In Halloween Costumes Trick Or Treating

Practicing good dental hygiene is important all year long, but when Halloween rolls around, the holiday can present some challenges for parents. Knowing that kids are anxious to dive into that bucket of candy loot, or over-do it at the neighborhood monster bash, those handing out the goodies at the door (as well as those throwing the party) can make some healthy choices ahead of time, to help keep the cavity goblins away.

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Barbeque Chickpea Sliders

Vegan mini burger made of chickpeas

Veggie sliders! Who knew? This tasty and nutritious alternative to beef or chicken will still wow the crowd gathered to watch the Big Game. (Your crew may even feel light enough for some backyard touch football by halftime!) Serve them up on a platter, and let ‘em choose their toppings, from avocado tomato, and barbeque sauce, to red onion, and more.

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Your Medication Checklist: Taking (and Trashing) Drugs Safely

Man looking at medicine while sitting by woman using laptop computer in kitchen at home

Whether you’re taking “over-the-counter” medication, or a prescription drug from your doctor, it’s easy to lose track of what you take and when. Review health history, and talk with your doctor about the specific medications or supplements that you’re on now, or the ones he/she may be recommending. A medication checklist for the fridge (and a copy to have with you for emergencies) can help keep your meds routine at your fingertips. This “mini chart” should include your name, plus your doctor’s and local drugstore’s phone numbers, at the top. List what medication you take, the start date of taking it, why you take it, how much you take, when you take it, and if you take it with or without food. Include any drug (or supplement) interaction dangers as well (as in, “don’t take this, with that”). Also note when you should stop taking it. Leave room at the bottom to list any of your drug allergies.

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